We've got:

- Google Chrome
- Blue Google Chrome
- Orange Chrome
- Red Chrome
- Round Chrome
- Microsoft Chrome
- ... and Firefox

@atoponce All because Mozilla made an explicit decision to stop supporting embedded Gecko and thereby completely give up the benefits of a downstream ecosystem - which includes any chance at having market share in the long term - a decade ago.

Someone should certainly build an alternative to the Chromium engine, but nobody's managed to actually do it.

@nat To be fair, Blink forked from WebKit which forked from KHTML. Now I'm not saying KHTML is up to speed with either WebKit or Blink, but if I were to build a competing web engine, I'd start there.

However, designing a well-performing, stable, secure web engine and JavaScript engine is anything but trivial.

@atoponce
Why so we news a JS engine? Can't we use a container to sandbox and run remote applications?
@nat

@loveisgrief @nat WebKit and Blink are web rendering engines, not JavaScript virtual machines. Not sure what you mean by sandboxes with remote applications however.

@atoponce
Those are all ways of limiting how applications can be written. Web browsers may as well be called "web app execution sandboxes". Everything runs on how HTML, CSS, and JS are interpreted.

Couldn't we ditch all that and run the apps in containers (OCI image or some other image type + namespaces)? Those would then be the rendering engine + sandbox ("VM")
@nat

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@loveisgrief @atoponce

Sure. Inventing a new web that isn't backward compatible with the old web would be pretty easy. Convincing anyone they wanted it would be somewhat more difficult.

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@nat
Why make anything new if no one is going to use it anyway?
@atoponce

@atoponce @loveisgrief I'm not a fan of Gemini. It strikes me as false nostalgia rather than anything actually useful.

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